21 Books I’ve Read in 2020

I used to be a far more avid reader when I was in college. In 2013, I read 105 books and I beat my goal of 100 by four. I love a good story and I love learning. What is better than reading a good book?!

In 2018 and 2019, I don’t think I read a single book. At the beginning of 2020, I talked myself into completing a minimal challenge of one book per month. Below is a review of all the books I’ve completed in 2020.



These are the books I’ve read in 2020

1. 10% Happier: How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found Self-Help That Actually Works by Dan Harris

I can tell you that this did not, in fact, make me 10% happier. Dan had a panic attack on live tv and then sought out a method to take the reigns back on his life. A good memoir.

2. Everything is F*cked: A Book About Hope by Mark Manson

A little funny at times, but a lot of the topics missed the mark.

3. Girl, Wash Your Face: Stop Believing the Lies about Who You Are So You Can Become Who You Were Meant to Be by Rachel Hollis

I thought I would like Rachel more after reading her book, but there’s just something about her that I don’t like. She’s too commercialized? I can’t quite put my finger on it.

4. Girl, Stop Apologizing: A Shame-Free Plan for Embracing and Achieving Your Goals by Rachel Hollis

I tried again with Rachel’s other book, but, again, was sorely disappointed. I guess I can’t relate with her or her fans. I’m the unpopular opinion.

5. Side Hustle: From Idea to Income in 27 Days by Chris Guillebeau

At one point this year, I thought I needed a side-hustle. This book touched on a lot of different ideas, but nothing that would ever find their way into my life and schedule.

6. The $100 Startup by Chris Guillebeau

Since I read the last book, I thought that he might have some more ideas into the side-hustle game. I don’t think I finished this book.

7. Becoming by Michelle Obama

Michelle Obama recounts her childhood growing up in the city of Chicago and how it led to her drive to begin a career in law. Then she moves on to how her and Barack had met and how their relationship grew from the start to the White House. I didn’t know much about the couple before reading this and it was very humanizing!

8. China Rich Girlfriend by Kevin Kwan

I love Crazy Rich Asians, but I’ve only seen the movie. This is book number two in the series, so I should’ve started with the first book. I really wanted to continue the story. While we drove home to Wisconsin in September, I had this audiobook playing in the car. 16 hours of audio is perfect for a 17 hour car ride.

9. Dear Girls by Ali Wong

The book was short and slightly funny. A lot of topics I couldn’t get on board with because I haven’t been through motherhood – so I was at a loss. I liked learning more about Ali after I saw her movie on Netflix Always Be My Maybe, which was super cute. This is a note to myself to watch some of her standup before reading her other book.

10. The Subtle Art of Not Giving A F*ck by Mark Manson

I wanted to read this book because I give entirely too many f*cks in my life. It wasn’t a self-help book, and didn’t lead me into that way of thinking, but it was a friendly reminder that I give away many hours of precious brain activity into other people instead of myself.

11. Over Her Dead Body by E.C. Sheedy

A whodunit type of mystery book, this one was given to me by Zack’s grandmother. It was a pretty quick read with only diving into a couple chapters a day. The writing wasn’t the best, but I wanted to know what happened to these people, haha.

12. Rich People Problems by Kevin Kwan

Again, after reading the second book, I still should go back to read the first book. Not as good of a story line as the second book and a little sad because the grandmother died. It didn’t really focus on Nick and Rachel at all either.

13. The Triumph of Katie Byrne by Barbara Taylor Bradford

I didn’t read the description before diving into this book, but I was definitely shocked after the first (of three) parts. I wasn’t expecting that sort of tragedy, but felt like the main character wasn’t too burdened by that in the second or third part. I enjoyed part two, where it mostly took place on an English estate, all while learning a little about the Brontë sisters. For part three, I didn’t feel a connection about the random love interest that seems to weigh on her at interesting intervals. I like it, but wouldn’t read it again.

14. The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas: A Story by Ursula K. Le Guin

A thought-provoking very short story.

15. Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office by Lois P. Frankel

About halfway through this book there was a section about your online and social media presence. This advice was great when the book was first written in 2010, but ten years later, the advice is very vague. Actually, a lot of advice is a little broad.

16. Daring Greatly by Brené Brown

I digested this book so quickly, that I didn’t let it sink in. Since I’m writing this late in the year, I had to go back to read reviews on what it was about. My bad. I would love to be more courageous and daring., but I didn’t exactly pick up or change any personal habits since reading this book.

17. Scarpetta by Patricia Cornwell

This book is part of a bigger series featuring the lead character, Scarpetta. Sometimes the author references something that much be a in another book, but you can read this story without reading anything else. It felt like a book version of a NCIS episode, but much slower, in book form.

18. Obsidian (Lux #1) by Jennifer L. Armentrout

Within the first chapter, all I could think was that Daemon was a replica of Edward – an alien instead of a vampire. I kept getting Twilight vibes the whole way through. The boy is made of light, for chrissakes – Edward sparkles. Need I go on?

19. The Darkest Star (Origin #1) by Jennifer L. Armentrout

The Darkest Star is the first book in a YA-series by Jennifer L. Armentrout. This is a spin-off from her Lux series, but you don’t need to read that first to get into this book. This story follow teenager, Evie, as she navigates a new relationship with Luc and the complication about her past and who is truly is.

20. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen R. Covey

I found this book highly repetitive and couldn’t get into it. I listened to this one on audio, so I didn’t get a view of all the charts. For how recommended this one is, I don’t see the hype.

21. Beautiful Boy: A Father’s Journey Through His Son’s Addiction by David Sheff

This is a memoir about a father desperate to save his son from his meth addiction. He recounts through various situations where he second-guesses himself at various events in the son’s life.

In conclusion

What have you been reading this year? Do you have any favorites to share with me? Write them in the comments below. And if you’re on Goodreads, add me as a friend!

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